August 20, 2014
Trying To Understand New York State's Regulation Of Business
Posted by David Zaring

You'd think that the state that's home to the center of American business would take a Delaware-style light touch approach to overseeing it.  But instead, the New York paradigm is to take ambitious politiicans, blend with broadly worded supervisory or anti-fraud statutes like the Martin Act, and come up with stuff that, to my ears, sounds almost every time like it is off-base, at least in the details.  So:

  • Eliot Spitzer pursued research analysts for the sin of sending cynical emails even though they issued buy recommendations, despite that fact that analysts never issue negative recommendations, and if cynical emails are a crime, law professors are the most guilty people in the world.
  • I still don't understand what Maurice Greenberg, risk worrier par excellence, did wrong when he was running AIG.  I do know that after he was forced out by Spitzer, the firm went credit default swap crazy.
  • Maybe there's something to the "you didn't tell your investors that you changed the way you did risk management for your mortgage program" prosecutions, but you'll note that it is not exactly the same thing as "you misrepresented the price and/or quality of the mortgage products you sold" prosecutions, which the state has not pursued.
  • Eric Schneiderman's idea that high frequency trading is "insider trading 2.0" is almost self-evidently false, as it is trading done by outsiders.
  • Federal regulators wouldn't touch Ben Lawsky's mighty serious claims that HSBC or BNP Paribas were basically enabling terrorist financing.
  • And now Lawsky is going after consultants for having the temerity to share a report criticizing the bank that hired them to review its own anti-money laundering practices with the bank, who pushed back on some, but not all of the conclusions.

The easiest way to understand this is to assume that AGs don't get to be governor (and bank supervisors don't get to be AGs) unless people wear handcuffs, and this is all a Rudy Giuliani approach to white collar wrongdoing by a few people who would like to have Rudy Giuliani's career arc.

But another way to look at it is through the dictum that the life of the law is experience, not logic.  The details are awfully unconvincing.  But these New York officials have also been arguing:

  • Having analysts recommending IPO purchases working for the banks structuring the IPO is dodgy.
  • HFT is front-running, and that's dodgy.
  • This new vogue for bank consulting is dodgy, particularly if it's just supposed to be a way for former bank regulators to pitch current bank regulators on leniency.
  • If we can't understand securitization gobbledegook, we can at least force you to employ a burdensome risk management process to have some faith that you, yourself, understand it.
  • And I'm not saying I understand the obsession with terrorism financing or what the head of AIG did wrong.

Their approach is the kind of approach that would put a top banker in jail, or at least on the docket, for the fact that banks presided over a securitization bubble in the run-up to the crisis.  It's the "we don't like it, it's fishy, don't overthink it, you're going to pay for it, and you'll do so publicly" approach.  It's kind of reminiscent of the saints and sinners theory of Delaware corporate governance.  And it's my pet theory defending, a little, what otherwise looks like a lot of posturing.

Administrative Law, Finance, Financial Crisis, Financial Institutions, White Collar Crime | Bookmark

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